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HUMA 101 - Introduction to the Humanities

A survey of some of the fields that make up areas of human understanding that we call the humanities. These areas may include art, music, drama, philosophy, religion, literature and critical thinking as well as justice, wealth and power, religion, and ecology. All areas are selected to provide important insights into our understanding of humanism.

 

Credits: 3

 

Hours: 45 (Lecture Hours: 3)

 

Total Weeks: 15

 

Prerequisites:

None

 

Non-Course Prerequisites:

None

 

Co-requisites:

None

 

Course Content:
This course is designed for first year college students. It considers selected fields that make up the areas of human understanding that we call the humanities. These include the arts, government, justice, wealth and power, religion, and ecology. All areas are selected to provide important insights into our understanding of humanism.
- Politics and Justice:
   
Lao-Tzu, Thoughts from the Tao-te Ching
    Niccolo Machiavelli, The Qualities of the Prince
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau, The Origin of Civil Society
    Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions
- Wealth and Poverty:
   
Adam Smith, Of the Natural Progress of Opulence
    Karl Marx, The Communist Manifesto
    Robert B. Reich, Why the Rich Are Getting Richer and the Poor, Poorer
- Faith, Religion, and Ecology :
   
His Holiness the Dalai Lama, The Ethic of Compassion
    The Bible, from St. Matthew
    Friedrich Nietzsche, Morality as Anti-Nature

    David Kinsley, Background to the Contemporary Discussion of Ecology and Religion

 

Learning Outcomes:
Upon successful completion of HUMA 101, students will be able to do the following:
- Develop critical thinking skills as they apply to the humanities
- Develop an awareness of the broad range that the humanities cover
- Form critical arguments about select works in the humanities
- Contrast authors' philosophies on select topics
- Participate in online discussion forums
- Write formal essays on assigned topics
- Demonstrate their work and understanding at a "coffee house" to be held at the college

Knowledge:
Determine what their philosophy of life is and why they believe in that philosophy

Attitudes:
Hold an open mind to others opinion and be able to think critically about what they learn

Skills:
Express that philosophy orally, through different art forms and in writing to others

 

Grading System: Letters

 

Passing Grade: D (50%)

 

Percentage of Individual Work: 90

 

Percentage of Group Work: 10

 

Additional  Course Comments:

It is expected that the students will attend every class, do all course work and actively participate in all class discussions

 

Textbooks:
Textbooks are subject to change.  Please contact the bookstore at your local campus for current book lists.
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