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HCAT 110 - Healing 1: Caring for Individuals Experiencing Common Health Challenges
Course Details

Course Code:

HCAT 110

Calendar Description:
This course introduces students to the normal structure and function of the human body and normal bodily changes associated with aging. Students will explore common challenges to health and healing in relation to each body system. Students will also be encouraged to explore person-centred practice as it relates to the common challenges to health and, in particular, to end-of-life care.

Date First Offered:
2010-07-01

Hours:
Total Hours: 115
Lecture Hours: 115

Total Weeks:
15

This course is offered online:
No

Pre-Requisites:
None

Non-Course Pre-Requisites:
None

Co-Requisites:
HCAT 111 Health 2: Lifestyle and Choices
HCAT 112 Health 1: Interpersonal Communications
HCAT 113 Health Care Assistant: Introduction to Practice
HCAT 123 Healing 1: Caring for Individuals Experiencing Common Health Challenges
HCAT 124 Healing 3: Personal Care and Assistance
HCAT 125 Healing 2: Caring for Individuals Experiencing Cognitive or Mental Challenges
HCAT 126 Practice Experience in Home Support and/or Assisted Living
HCAT 127 Practice Experience in Multi-Level and/or Complex Care

Rearticulation Submission:
No

Course Content:
Medical Terminology
- Word elements
- Abbreviations

Structure and function of the human body
- Organization of the human body: cells, tissues and organs
- Major body systems:
- Integumentary
- Musculo-skeletal
- Cardiovascular
- Respiratory
- Digestive
- Urinary
- Reproductive
- Endocrine
- Nervous
- Immune
- Natural changes associated with aging

Challenges to health and healing
- The experience of illness and disability
- Common challenges to healing:
- Transitions
- Loss
- Pain
- Illness
- Death
- Broad effects on the individual and family of health challenges (i.e. changes in physical health can be expected to also affect social, emotional, cognitive, and spiritual health)
- Common disorders related to each body system:
- Integumentary (pressure ulcers, pain)
- Musculo-skeletal (Falls, fractures, contractures, Arthritis, Osteoporosis, pain)
- Cardiovascular (hypertension, hypotension, edema, coronary artery disease, blood clots, heart failure, CVA-stroke)
- Respiratory (cyanosis, dyspnea, apnea, othopnea, hyperventilation, hypoventilation, COPD, asthma, pneumonia)
- Digestive (vomiting, diarrhea, dysphagia, lack of appetite, dehydration, constipation, obesity,
Hiatal Hernia, Diverticular disease)
- Urinary (urinary tract infections, renal failure, hepatitis)
- Reproductive (STIs)
- Endocrine (Diabetes)
- Neurological (stroke, Parkinson’s Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, ALS, brain or spinal cord injuries)
- Sensory Challenges:
- Normal sensory changes of aging
- Speech and Language Challenges (Aphasia, apraxia, dysarthria)
- Hearing and Visual challenges
- Multi-organ (cancer, AIDS)
- Chronic Illness:
- Basic definition and concepts
- Implications for care
- Focus on self-care
- Applying critical thinking and problem-solving when caring for individuals experiencing common health challenges in facilities and in the community:
- Gathering information
- Sources of information (e.g. care plan, healthcare team, client/resident)
- Observing changes in the client/resident
- Establishing priorities for care
- Carrying out plan of care
- Evaluating effectiveness of care
- Reporting and recording

Preventing Infection
- Microorganisms and the spread of infection
- Principles and practice of medical asepsis in facilities and in community settings
- Dealing with “super bugs”
- Standard precautions
- Isolation guidelines
- Observing for infestations of vermin in home environments and appropriate actions to prevent spread

Nutrition and Healing
- Nutrition in relation to health challenges
- Cultural differences
- Special diets:
- Modified diets
- Restricted diets
- Diabetic diet
- High protein diet
- Liquid and pureed diets
- Preparing special diets from written instructions (in the home)
- Involving the client in meal preparation (in the home)
- Community resources

End-of-Life Care
- Hospice and palliative care – philosophy and principles of care
- The Journey of dying – understanding and coming to terms with death and dying
- Caring and problem-solving as related to palliative care in facilities and in community settings
- Legal/ethical practice and safety in palliative care
- Quality of life issues – honouring the individual and family/rituals
- Common reactions/experiences as people approach death
- Physical, emotional, cognitive and spiritual needs and appropriate interventions
- Comfort measures for:
- Pain
- Breathing challenges
- Challenges with eating and drinking
- Dehydration
- Bowel function
- Restlessness
- Delirium
- Common reactions of family members and ways to support the family
- The moment of death and care of the body after death
- Grief and grieving
- Self-care for the care-giver:
- Personal and professional boundaries
- Recognizing the impact of loss on the care-giver
- Recognizing signs of and preventing stress and burnout

Learning Outcomes:
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
1. Display an understanding of the structure and function of the human body and normal changes
associated with aging:
- Describe the organization of the human body: cells, tissues and organs
- Describe the structure and functions of the major body systems
- Discuss the natural changes in each system associated with aging

2. Display a sound understanding of common challenges to health and healing:
- Discuss the experience of illness, disability and common challenges to healing
- Discuss the experience of chronic illness and implications for care
- Describe common health challenges related to the each body system:
- Integumentary (pressure ulcers, pain)
- Musculo-skeletal (Falls, fractures, contractures, Arthritis, Osteoporosis, pain)
- Cardiovascular (hypertension, hypotension, edema, coronary artery disease, blood clots, heart
failure, CVA-stroke)
- Respiratory (cyanosis, dyspnea, apnea, othopnea, hyperventilation, hypoventilation, COPD,
asthma, pneumonia)
- Digestive (vomiting, diarrhea, dysphagia, lack of appetite, dehydration, constipation, obesity,
- Hiatal Hernia, Diverticular disease)
- Urinary (urinary tract infections, renal failure, hepatitis)
- Reproductive (STIs)
- Endocrine (Diabetes)
- Neurological (stroke, Parkinson’s Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, ALS, brain or spinal cord injuries)
- Sensory Challenges (aphasis, apraxia, dysarthria, hearing and visual challenges)
- Multi-organ (cancer, AIDS)

3. Discuss nutrition as it relates to healing:
- Discuss nutrition in relation to common health challenges
- Identify components of common special diets
- Identify community resources

4. Describe ways to organize, administer and evaluate person-centred care and service for clients/ residents experiencing common health challenges:
- Discuss person-centred/caring approaches appropriate for specific health challenges
- Describe aspects of critical thinking and problem-solving that should be utilized when caring for individuals experiencing common health challenges

5. Demonstrate an understanding of the components of person-centred end-of-life care for clients/residents and families:
- Discuss the philosophy and principles of care used in hospice and palliative care settings
- Describe caring and problem-solving as these relate to end-of-life care in facilities and in community settings
- Discuss elements of legal/ethical practice in end-of-life care
- Describe common reactions/experiences as people approach death
- Discuss physical, emotional, cognitive and spiritual needs of the dying person and appropriate interventions
- Discuss common reactions of family members and ways to support the family
- Describe processes involved in the care of the body after death
- Discuss the effects of a client/resident’s death on the healthcare workers involved in the dying process
- Display an understanding of the importance of and ways to provide self-care for the care-giver following a death

Grading System:
Percentage

Passing Grade:
75%

Grading Weight:
Final Exam: 25 %
Midterm Exam: 25 %
Quizzes and Tests: 20 %
Assignments: 20 %
Participation: 10 %

Number of Assignments:
1

Nature of Participation:
Participation in online discussion

Writing Assignments:
4-6 page essay on case study

Percentage of Individual Work:
100

Course Offered in Other Programs:
No

Additional Comments:
The courses in this program run concurrently.
Some course materials must be accessed on the NLC D2L server. A tutorial will be provided. Internet access is needed. Basic computer skills are recommended.
Some travel may be required.
Attendance schedule may vary.

Text Books:

List will be provided by Instructor

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