HIST 104 - Canada, Post-Confederation

This course is a survey of Canada's political, economic, and social development from 1867 to the Present.

 

Credits: 3

 

Hours: 45 (Lecture Hours: 3)

 

Total Weeks: 15

 

Prerequisites:

None, but ENGL 100 is highly recommended

 

Non-Course Prerequisites:

None

 

Co-Requisites:

None

 

Course Content:
- Confederation and the British North America Act
- Incorporation of Rupert's Land
- The 1869 Rebellion and the Manitoba Act
- British Columbia joins Confederation
- John A Macdonald and the Pacific Scandal
- 1885 Rebellions, and Quebec reaction to Louis Riel's execution
- The Schools issue in New Brunswick, Manitoba and Ontario
- Wilfrid Laurier, Labour and Industrialization
- Alberta and Saskatchewan created
- Suffrage movement and reforms
- WWI and Robert Borden
- Winnipeg General Strike
- W.L. Mackenzie King and political scandals
- Canada, the Great Depression and R.B. Bennett
- Labour and new political parties
- Mackenzie King and WWII
- Women and minorities in the Canadian war effort
- Newfoundland enters Canada
- Diefenbaker and Kennedy
- Quebec under Duplessis
- Quebec's Quiet Revolution
- P. E. Trudeau and the Constitutional Act, 1982
- Brian Mulroney and the restraint on the "welfare state"

- First Nations in the 20th Century: from the Indian Act to Nunavut

 

Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

Knowledge:
- Explain critical themes, events, and issues in the construction of Canada since 1867
- Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how tensions between different ethnic groups have shaped Canadian history
- Evaluate Canada's changing relation with the United States and Britain

- Evaluate Canada's economic, cultural and social development, in particularly the development of social welfare

Skills:
- Identify arguments in historical texts
- Contrast and compare historical arguments in texts on similar topics but with different arguments

- Write essays using academic language and structure

Technologies:
- Access written texts through D2L
- Contribute to online discussions through D2L

- Submit written assignments through D2L

Attitudes:

- Appreciate and respect other students opinions.  Learn to work in a group.

 

Grading System: Letters

 

Passing Grade: D (50%)

 

Percentage of Individual Work: 95

 

Percentage of Group Work: 5

 

Addition Course Comments:
The essay assignments must be submitted through the D2L dropbox, which automatically also screens the text using Turnitin, a text-matching program that detects faulty paraphrasing.  In order to avoid plagiarism charges, students will have opportunity to screen their essays through Turnitin before submitting it for marking.

 

Textbooks:
Textbooks are subject to change.  Please contact the bookstore at your local campus for current book lists.